DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Assignments must be typed in font size 12, double spaced, and submitted by the due date. You are required to provide two copies of each assignment. Each assignment must have your name, course number, course name, assignment title and the date submitted.

Late Assignments

Assignments are due on the dates listed in the syllabus. Grades for late assignments would be reduced. The Professor reserves the right not to accept assignments after due dates. Lesson Plan Projects must be approved by the professor prior to presentation/teaching at the field experience site.

 

Expectations

 

Students are expected to attend every session on time. If an emergency arises and a student is absent, the student is expected to contact the professor and set up an appointment to review missed instruction. All students are expected to provide a working telephone number and email address on the first day of class. Please inform professor if you anticipate absence.

 

 

C. REQUIRED PURCHASES: TEXTBOOK 

 

  1. Van De Walle, John A. & LouAnn H. Lovin. Teaching Student-Centered  Mathematics: Grades K-3. Volume One. 2006

 

   2.  Constance Kamii & Leslie Baker Housman. Young Children reinvent Arithmetic: Implications of Piaget’s Theory. Second Edition. 2000.

 

New York State Education Department Curriculum Standards retrieved at www.nysed.gov

 

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Standards http://www.naeyc.org/

 

New York City Curriculum Frameworks retrieved at www.schools.nyc.gov

 

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards at www.nctm.org

 

  

DASSIGNMENTS

     

There are six assignments in this course:

 

1.   Technology assignment 10 points

  1. Integrated mathematics unit 20 points
  2. Lesson plan accompanied with students’ work, children’s reflection of the lesson, your reflection, and evaluation of the lesson.  20 points
  3. 4.      Literature based demo-lesson 15 points
  4. 5.      Resource file    15 points
  5. Reading Response 5 points

7.    Final project       20

 

Class participation (readings, discussions), homework, and problem-solving activities 5 points

 

Field Work Requirement: Attached in syllabus part 2 

 

E. All assignments must be completed on time.  Log sheets must be completed and submitted in duplicate for all field assignments. Log sheets must accompany fieldwork writing assignments.

 

Submit two copies of all assignments.

 

F. COURSE TOPICS/UNITS/READINGS AND DATES  

This course requires a one-to one meeting with the professor. Please make arrangements with the Professor in advance. This meeting is mandated.

 

TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE: This is a tentative course outline that might change depending on how things go.

DATE

          CHAPTERS

TOPICS

Session 1

September 1,2010

 

Introduction to course, learning by doing mathematics [NYS v,vii,ix, INTASC 1,3,4,7,8,9, ACEI 1,2D]

Reading: Chapter 1, 3, 4: Kamii, Chapter 1: De Walle

September  8/10

Session 2

NO CLASS

 

 

Session 3

September 15/10

 Chapter 1, 3, 4, Kamii

Chapter 1: De Walle

Students center math instruction, role of social interaction in logic/math

Constructivism: Piaget and Vygotsky [NYS v,vii,ix, ACEI 2D]

Teaching with technology

Session 4

September 22/10

Chapter 1: De Walle

Chapter 9, Kamii  

 

Teaching with problems, problem based lesson planning, solving story problems.

HW: Write a math lesson plan for Kindergarten or first grade children  

 

Session 5

September 29/10

Chapter 1, Kamii  

Chapter 2: De Walle

 

Math with literature, developing early number concepts, how young children acquire number sense [NYS v,vii,ix, INTASC I, 3, ACEI 2D]

HW: Write a lesson plan using a children’s book 

Technology Resource  Presentation

Session 6

October 06/10

Chapter 5, 6 Kamii   

Chapter 3: De Walle

 

Abstraction and Representation: developing meaning for addition and subtraction[NYS v,vii,ix, INTASC I, 3, ACEI 2D] 

Technology Resource Presentation

Session 7

October 13/10

Chapter 7: Kamii

Chapter  4: De Walle

 

Multiplication and division as objective, basic fact mastery

Multiplication and division facts

HW: Design an activity to teach addition or subtraction

Session 8

October 20/10

Chapter  5: De Walle

 

 

Teaching math through math center, designing an effective math center

Pre-Base- ten concepts and place value

Session 9

October 27/10

Chapter  7: De Walle

 

Geometric thinking and geometric concepts

Session 10

November 3/10

Chapter  10: De Walle

 

 

Algebraic thinking/patterns [NYS v, vii, ix, ACEI 2d]

Session 11

November 10/10

Chapter  4: De Walle

 

 

Teaching mathematics to culturally and linguistically diverse learners

Developing measurement concepts [NYS ,vii,ix, INTASC I, 3, ACEI 2d]

 

Session 13

November 17/10

 

Chapter 7: Kamii

 

Teaching mathematics to exceptional children with special needs

Teaching mathematics with games

Session 14

November 24/10

 

NAYCE and NAECS/SDE

document 

Early childhood curriculum, assessment and program evaluation

Assessment tools [NYS v,vii, ACEI 3C, 4]

Lesson Demonstration

Session 15

December 1/10

 

 

Data analysis, classification, helping children use data

Lesson demonstration

December 8/10

 

 

Last day of class

Lesson Demonstration

December 15/10

 

 

Final Project Presentation

 

 

Assignment Due Dates

 

9. 25. 10

Internet presentation

10.26.10

Reading Response

11.17. 10

 

11. 24. 10

Unit Plan

Demo Lesson Presentation

12.01.10

Teaching Lesson Demonstration

 

12.15.10

 

Final project presentation

 

 

Please keep duplicate electronic and hard copies of all work submitted!

 

 

ASSESSMENT

Assignments 1 through 7 will be assessed with a rubric. Assignments are graded based upon content and format. Each assignment will be graded as follows:

 

 

MEC GRADING SYSTEM

Symbol

Range

MEC Definitions

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

Performance Criteria

A+

97 – 100

Exceptional

Exemplary

(3)

A

93.6 – 96.9

Excellent

A-

90 – 92.9

Outstanding

B+

87.1 – 89.9

Very Good

 

Competent

(2)

B

83 – 87

Good

B-

80 – 82.9

Good

C+

77 – 79.9

Satisfactory

 

Emerging

(1)

C

70 – 76.9

Satisfactory

D

60 – 69.9

Passing

 

Unacceptable

(0)

F

0 – 59.9

Failure/

Unsuccessful completion of course

 

 

 

 

Recent Bibliography:

 

Johnson A. (2010) Teaching mathematics to culturally and linguistically diverse learners.

 Pearson.

Whitin, P. & Whitin, D. J.(2000). Math is language too: Talking and writing in the mathematics

            classroom. Urbana, IL. NCTE.

 

Fosonot, C.T. & Dolk, M. (2001). Young mathematicians at work: Constructing number sense,

 addition and subtraction. Portsmouth, NH. Heinemann.

 

Carpenter, T. P., Fennma E., Franke, M.L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. (1999).  Children’s

            mathematics:  Cognitively guided instruction.  NH:  Heinmann.

 

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2002).  Learning and teaching mathematics with

 technology  [Focus Issue].  Teaching Children Mathematics, 8(6).

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.