DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 Assignments must be typed in double- spaced, 12-point font, and edited carefully for spelling, syntax, and punctuation and submitted by the due date. Each assignment must have your name, course number, course name, assignment title and the date submitted.

 

 Late Assignments

Assignments are due on the dates listed in the syllabus. Grades for late assignments may be reduced. The Professor reserves the right not to accept Assignments after due dates. Lesson Plan Projects must be approved by the professor prior to presentation/teaching at the field experience site.

 

Expectations

  • Students are expected to attend every session on time. Any absence exceeding 15% of the class meeting time (i.e., 2 class sessions) can result in a lowering of your grade.
  •  You are expected to exhibit professional behavior and dispositions.

 

  • You are expected to come to class ready to discuss the main ideas of the readings, contributing your own ideas, insights, and reflection.
  •  Participate in class discussions, presentations and other activities. Your participation depends upon you timeliness in attendance. You are expected to participate fully in group discussions, and demonstrate a professional attitude by listening carefully to the ideas of others.

 If an emergency arises and a student is absent, the student is expected to contact the professor and set up an appointment to review missed instruction. All students are expected to provide a working telephone number and email address on the first day of class.

  

C. REQUIRED PURCHASES: TEXTBOOK 

 

1. Required textbook: Van De Walle, John A.  Elementary School Mathematics: Teaching

                                     Developmentally, Seventh Edition, New York: Longman Publishers, 2008.

2. Field Experience Guide for Van De Walle, John A.  Elementary School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally, Seventh Edition, New York: Longman Publishers, 2008.

 

New York State Education Department Curriculum Standards retrieved at  www.nysed.gov

 

New York City Curriculum Frameworks retrieved at  www.schools.nyc.gov

 

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards at  www.nctm.org

 

  1. ASSIGNMENTS

       There are six assignments in this course:

1.    Internet assignment 15 points

2.    Lesson plan accompanied with students’ work, children’s reflection of the lesson, your reflection, and evaluation of the lesson.  25 points

3.    Big number presentation  15 points

4.    Demo-lesson 20 points

5.  Mathematics Toolkit      15 points

6.  Reading response 5 points

 

Class participation (readings, discussions), homework, and problem-solving activities 5 points

 

Field Work Requirement: Attached in syllabus part 2 

 

E. All assignments must be completed on time.  Log sheets must be completed and submitted in duplicate for all field assignments. Log sheets must accompany fieldwork writing assignments.

Submit two copies of all assignments.

 

F. COURSE TOPICS/UNITS/READINGS AND DATES  

 

Attendance is mandated. Coming late or leaving early constitute partial absences and, cumulatively, will have the same impact as absences.

 

Field Work Requirement: Attached in syllabus part 2 

E. All assignments must be completed on time.  Log sheets must be completed and submitted in duplicate for all field assignments. Log sheets must accompany fieldwork writing assignments.

Submit two copies of all assignments.

 

TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE: This is a tentative course outline that might change depending on how things go.

Date

Chapter

Topic

Week 1

8/30/10

 

9/01/10

       

 

             

        1

                  

Welcome, intro to course

 

Directions of mathematics education

     [NYS v,vii,ix, INTASC 1,3,4,7,8,9, ACEI 1,2D]

Week 2

 

9/13/10

 

9/15/10

 

       

NO CLASS

 

Week 3

9/20/10

 

9/22/10

 

 

      2,3

 

Constructivist approach to learning and implications       

for instruction [NYS v,vii,ix, ACEI 2D]

Week 4

9/27/10

 

9/29/10

 

 

 

Internet Presentation

Week 5

10/4/10

 

10/06/10

 

 

Teaching mathematics through problem solving

 [NYS ix, ACEI 2D] 

 

Week 6

10/11/10

 

10/13/10

 

Building assessment into instruction;

 

Teaching all children:  Disabilities, linguistically diverse,equity [NYS v,vii, ACEI 3C, 4]

 

Week 7

10/11/10

10/13/10

 

No CLASS ON 10/11/10

 

Big Number presentation

Week 8

10/18/10

 

10/20/10

 

 

Teaching math with technology; [NYS v,vii,ix, INTASC I, 3, ACEI 2D]

 

Developing early number concepts program     

 

Week 9

 

 

Meanings of the four operations; Strategies for

mastering the basic facts [NYS v,vii,ix, INTASC I, 3, ACEI 2D]

  

Week 10

 

 

Place-Value, and invented strategies [NYS v,vii,ix, ACEI 2D]         

NO CLASS ON NOVEMBER 3/10

 

Week 11

 

Algebraic thinking [NYS v, vii, ix, ACEI 2d]  

 

Demo lesson presentation

Week 12

 

 

Demo lesson presentation

 

Fraction Concept

Reading response due

 

Week  13

 

Computation with fractions

 

 Decimal and percent concept

 

Week 14

 

Measurement concept: Estimating, area, volume and capacity, weight and mass, measuring time, measuring angles

 

 

 

Theoretical versus experimental probability

 

 

 

 

Teaching lesson presentation

 

 

Assignment Due Dates

 

9/20-22/10

 

Internet presentation ,written report websites

 

10/13/10

Big number presentation

Accompanied Written report

 

10/25/10

Reading response

11/10-15/10

Demo lesson presentation

High- Stake writing ((Explanation of content Knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and the knowledge of teaching environment)

 

12/15/10

 

Tool kit, fieldwork due

 

12.14.10

Teaching lesson

High- Stake Writing Assignment: Conceptual Essay (Explanation of content Knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and the knowledge of teaching environment)

Please keep duplicate electronic and hard copies of all work submitted!

 

 ASSESSMENT

Assignments 1 through 7 will be assessed with a rubric. Assignments are graded based upon content and format. Each assignment will be graded as follows:

 

 MEC GRADING SYSTEM

Symbol

Range

MEC Definitions

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

Performance Criteria

A+

97 – 100

Exceptional

Exemplary

(3)

A

93.6 – 96.9

Excellent

A-

90 – 92.9

Outstanding

B+

87.1 – 89.9

Very Good

 

Competent

(2)

B

83 – 87

Good

B-

80 – 82.9

Good

C+

77 – 79.9

Satisfactory

 

Emerging

(1)

C

70 – 76.9

Satisfactory

D

60 – 69.9

Passing

 

Unacceptable

(0)

F

0 – 59.9

Failure/

Unsuccessful completion of course

Medgar Evers  College Policy  on Academic integrity

      Academic Dishonesty is prohibited in Manhattanville College and is punishable by

      penalties, including failing grades, suspension, and expulsion as provided at: 

     

ADA Statement

      Students with disabilities needing academic accommodation should:  (1) register with and

       provide documentation to the Special Services Office; (2) bring a letter to the

 instructor indicating the need for accommodation and what type. This should be done during the first    week of class.

 

USE OF STUDENT WORK

      All teacher education programs in New York State undergo periodic reviews by accreditation

agencies and the state education department.  For these purposes, samples of students’     work  are made available to those professionals conducting the review.  Student anonymity is 

assured under these circumstances.  If you do not wish to have your work made available for these purposes, please let the professor know before the start of the second class.  Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

 

J.  RECENT BIBLIOGRAPHY

 Carpenter, T. P., Fennma E., Franke, M.L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. (1999).  Children’s mathematics:  Cognitively guided instruction.  NH:  Heinmann.

 

Curcio, F.R. (1999).  Dispelling myths about reform in school mathematics.  Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 4,  282-284.

 Fennema, E., Carpenter, T.P., Franke, M.L. & Carey, D. A. (1993).  Leaning to use children’s mathematics thinking:  A case study.  In R. B. Davis & C. A. Maher, (Eds.), School mathematics and the world of reality (93-117).  Needham Heights, MA:  Allyn & Bacon.

 

Fosnot, C. T., & Dolk, M (2002) Young mathematicians at work:  Constructing fractions, decimals, and percents.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

 Jones, G. A., Thornton, C. A., Putt, I. J., Hill, K. M., Mogill, A.T., Rich, B. S., & Van Zoest, L. R. (1996).  Multidigit number sense: A framework for instruction and assessment.  Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 27, 31—336.

 

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.  (1990). Geometry and geometric thinking [Focus Issue].    Teaching Children Mathematics, 5(6).

 

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2002).  Learning and teaching mathematics with technology  [Focus Issue].  Teaching Children Mathematics, 8(6).

 

 

Nitabach, E., & Lehrer, R. (1996).  Developing spatial sense through area measurement.  Teaching Children Mathematics, 2, 473-476.

 

Polya, George.  Hoe to Solve It.  Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1973.  Worth, Ill.:  Creative Publications. Lambdin, D. V., Kehle, P.E., & Preston, R. V. (Eds.) (1996).  Emphasis on assessment: Readings from NCTM’s school-based journals.  Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

 

Rathmell, E. C. Leutzinger, L. P., & Gabriele, A. (2000). Thinking with numbers. Cedar Falls, IA:  Thinking with Numbers, Inc.

 

Russell, S. J.  (2001).  Developing computational fluency with whole numbers.  Teaching Children Mathematics, 7, 155-158.

 

Thornton, C. A., & Bley, N.S. (Eds.).  (1994)Windows pf opportunity: Mathematics for students with special needs.  Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.